Ground School – Instrument Pilot

Tomorrow is the flight to the big game and you and your buddies are anxious to begin the journey because you have rented a Club airplane and will be flying the crew there. As luck would have it a peek at the extended forecast is showing a chance of MVFR along your route and a mention that your destination airport may be IFR at your arrival time. Now the waiting game begins. You check the Weather Channel, Weather Bug and even the Old Farmer’s Almanac in hopes one of them will dispute what the FAA weather gurus are planning for your weekend.

You have thought about obtaining your instrument rating before but just didn’t have the time and didn’t think you would use it much anyway. Now here you are facing the same “do I stay or do I go? –  more like now “do I fly or do I drive?”.

More recently the FAA has changed the rules regarding an Approved Aviation Training Device or an AATD. An approved AATD can be used up to 20 hours of the required 40, as shown in FAR 61.65 for pilots and 61.4 for simulators. Attached is FAA document which explains the use of an AATD. The use of an AATD could cut the cost the instrument rating by possible 40%! OAS will be acquiring an Cessna NAV III Garmin G1000 NXi in the near future for your use. You can use it solo, with your instructor or an OAS contract instructor.

OK now you’re running out of excuses in obtaining your instrument rating. OAS offers ground sessions preparing you to take the FAA Instrument Airplane Knowledge Test, all within a unique training atmosphere!

Call us at OAS and we will help you get your head in the clouds!

IFR / Instrument Class Schedules

Now a word from the FAA;

FAA Approved Aviation Training Devices (ATD) as of 02/04/2020

 

The General Aviation and Commercial Division provides for the evaluation and approval of ATD’s as a Basic or Advanced Aviation Training Device (BATD/AATD), as permitted under 14 CFR part 61.4(c). Advisory circular AC 61-136, FAA Approval of Aviation Training Devices and Their Use for Training and Experience provides the guidance for ATD approval and use. An FAA Letter of Authorization (LOA) is provided to the manufacturer for each model that qualifies. The manufacturer is responsible for providing the FAA LOA to operators of the ATD. FAA guidance for inspector ATD oversight is located in FAA Order 8900.1 Volume 11, Chapter 10, Section 1, Aviation Training Devices (ATD). Note: ATD’s are not Flight Training Devices (FTD) or Full Flight Simulators (FSS) qualified under 14 CFR part 60. ATD’s must be accompanied by the FAA letter of authorization (LOA) and FAA approved Qualification and Guide (QAG) documents when used to satisfy any experience requirements specified in 14 CFR part 61 or 141.

The LOA lists the specific part 61 & 141 time or training credit allowances, are valid for 60 calendar months, and must contain an expiration date to be valid. Important conditions and limitations are listed in the LOA.

A copy of the LOA must be provided to any individual using pilot time logged in an ATD to meet training or experience requirements identified in 14 CFR Part 61 or 141 pursuant to an airman certificate, rating, or privilege.

Designated pilot examiners should request to see a copy of the LOA, when ATD time is used to meet the minimum pilot experience requirements for an airman certificate or rating.

Aircraft “type” rating training or experience requirements cannot be accomplished in an ATD. Procedural ground training only.

Pilot time can only be logged in an ATD as Total Time, Instrument Time, and/or Instruction Received (See 8710-1 form).

Pilot certification, practical tests, or Part 141 stage exams/end of course evaluations cannot be accomplished in an ATD.